Computer Dealer News

Can’t go old school with hybrid cloud says top Dell executive

Toronto – At the Dell Power To Do More Summit 2016 approximately 500 customers and channel partners heard Dell’s hybrid cloud plan for the Canadian market.

Jim Ganthier, Dell’s VP and GM of Engineered Solutions, HPC and Cloud, told the audience by the end of the decade the marketplace will pass 80 per cent adoption of hybrid cloud. “The cloud opportunity for the channel is big and growing fast,” Ganthier said.

From Dell’s market forecast Ganthier said the cloud market will reach $175 billion in 2019. Today it’s at $100 billion and growing at a 15 per cent CAGR.
He added that the marketplace is shifting to hybrid cloud and it’s quickly becoming the fabric on how IT is delivered today. Ganthier expects that by 2018 80 per cent of the market will be on hybrid cloud.

“This new type of cloud has big data and if you stay in the old school legacy scenario you will get yourself into slight trouble,” he added.

The market positioning on cloud has also changed. Just a few short years ago the thought was that it would be a 100 per cent public cloud. “But when reality set in the trend moved to hybrid and those who have figured it out now have the right cost models in place and are achieving the right business results/”

The key aspect for the channel is to determine the customer journey because each customer will have a different entry point and a different set of needs. “One size does not fit all,” Ganthier said.

In terms of product offering Dell has covered its basis for hybrid cloud with Dell Hybrid Cloud System for Microsoft, RA with VMware and with Red Hat Open Stack.

Dell is also addressing the challenges facing both channel and customer on managing CapEx with Opex. The vendor has introduced Cloud Flex Pay program, which gives customers an option to deploy the Dell Hybrid Cloud System for Microsoft without any long-term payments so if usage levels rise their costs are more predictable.
Cloud Flex Pay also addresses the issues of underused and unanticipated demand or services gaps that can lead to increased costs.